4 Ways To Conquer Jealousy

A colleague makes promotion at work, while you remain unnoticed. A friend buys a beautiful house, while in your tiny apartment you are still struggling to make ends meet. Your brother has natural charisma and stunning good qualities, whereas you’re just…okay. Feeling helpless and weak, you inflate the other person to supernatural proportions. ‘Why them? Why not me?’ you ask despondently. Slowly but surely that sibling, friend or colleague becomes your worst enemy, constantly, if not purposely, flaunting his or her superiority. Before you even noticed, the green-eyed monster of jealousy has sunk its venomous teeth into your neck. For a life-changing experience, read Sri Chinmoy’s book The Jewels of Happiness. Timeless truths, easy-to-follow meditation exercises and sound spiritual advice from a truly enlightened author. Check it out now! We all have wrestled the green-eyed monster at some point(s) in our life. Every time we marvel at its superhuman strength. Entire empires and civilisations have been destroyed by it. Despite our sincere efforts to try and live a conscious and loving life jealousy immediately brings out the worst in us. You catch yourself hoping your successful colleague will be fired, or your friend’s new house will be robbed. You know you should be happy for them, but you feel exactly the opposite… My own spiritual teacher Sri Chinmoy suffered much from jealousy. Whenever he smiled at one of his students, he ran the risk of the person sitting next to that student becoming jealous. He often said that without jealousy the world would make much faster progress. Jealousy comes from our ego, which like to feel superior. It constantly...

My journey from atheism to faith

I started my life a devout atheist. In my teens I was convinced that God was a fairytale, and I looked down on people who believed. Didn’t they see the overwhelming odds against them? One look at the world and all its suffering should be proof enough that there is no benign, all-loving Entity calling the shots. God was just a man-made invention to alleviate his fear of death and the unknown, so said my teenage theological doctrine. For a life-changing experience, read Sri Chinmoy’s book The Jewels of Happiness. Timeless truths, easy-to-follow meditation exercises and sound spiritual advice from a truly enlightened author. Check it out now! I remember a geography lesson in high-school where I led a heated discussion with a boy in my class who was a God-believer. Although I unleashed one logical argument on him after the other, still the kid wouldn’t listen to reason. If someone would have told my cocksure thirteen-year-old self that a mere five years later I would also believe in God, I would have told them they were crazy. But I discovered that atheism can be fruitful soil for the spiritual life. It’s like a clean slate, untainted by institutional religion or strict religious upbringing, which God can imprint with His own signature. How did this miraculous change happen? It was during the year I was an exchange student in Canada. My host parents were religious, and out of curiosity I started reading some scripture. I read that if you wanted to know if God really existed, you could actually ask him with a sincere prayer. I decided to pop...

Self-transcendence: the royal road to happiness

What I remember most about my first marathon is that the distance was about 10K too long. Like 99% of all marathon runners I was exhausted after 32K and realized I had ten more to go. They were to become the most agonizing kilometres of my life. The more the finish line neared, the more agonizing they became. My body screamed and begged for mercy, but I just continued putting one foot in front of the other. And suddenly there it was, glistening in the distance like the shore of a new land – the finish line! Once I crossed it a miracle occurred. The pain suddenly vanished and a powerful feeling of joy and happiness flooded my entire being. That first marathon taught me an extremely valuable lesson about happiness. I discovered that happiness is the reward for challenging and transcending your personal limitations. For a life-changing experience, read Sri Chinmoy’s book The Jewels of Happiness. Timeless truths, easy-to-follow meditation exercises and sound spiritual advice from a truly enlightened author. Check it out now! When you transcend yourself in any field, happiness is bound to be there. First-time marathoners know what I’m talking about, but so does anyone who has ever sincerely tried to go beyond what their minds conceived of as impossible. Perhaps the greatest example of this is Ashrita Furman, an American 58-year-old who is known the world over for holding the most Guinness Book records in the world. He has broken over 500 Guinness records during his life, with over 200 still standing. Some records are really hard, like holding a brick in one hand...

The world’s most underestimated quality

Ask any person which quality they would like to have best in their lives and you’ll probably get a host of answers like love, joy, compassion, courage or determination. Likely though, patience will not be one of them. Patience is like the black sheep in the family of divine qualities. It is arguably the most undervalued and underestimated virtue of all. But if we truly knew the value and meaning of patience, we would rate it a lot higher. And perhaps even put it at the very top of our list. Here are three common misconceptions about patience. For a life-changing experience, read Sri Chinmoy’s book The Jewels of Happiness. Timeless truths, easy-to-follow meditation exercises and sound spiritual advice from a truly enlightened author. Check it out now! Misconception#1: Patience is weakness Truth: Patience is the road to success We often associate patience with a state of helplessness or weakness. When people are not acting in the way we expect them to, we are told to be patient with them. Or if our desires are not fulfilled, we are forced into patience. We feel patience is something that is thrust upon us, making us a weak and helpless victim of time. But go and ask highly successful people about the meaning of patience in their lives and you’ll probably get a whole different answer. They’ll tell you patience is the key. Success is not like instant coffee. It is often the work of a lifetime (or lifetimes, if you – like me – believe in reincarnation), the result of constant self-giving effort. Patience Means Success ultimate -Sri Chinmoy Misconception:...

How to become an inner hero

When we think of a hero we usually think of someone who saves another person’s life, fights for a just cause or achieves extraordinary success in his or her field. In the outer life heroism is judged by someone’s actions, and traditionally a hero is someone who has shown exemplary courage or sacrifice. But there is also something called inner heroism. An inner hero is someone who struggles with his or her own imperfections and strives to become the best possible version of him- or herself. This is the path of true nobility and character building. Not everyone can become an outer hero. But all of us can become true inner heroes. Here are seven steps to inner heroism. For a life-changing experience, read Sri Chinmoy’s book The Jewels of Happiness. Timeless truths, easy-to-follow meditation exercises and sound spiritual advice from a truly enlightened author. Check it out now! 1. Accept the world as it is We don’t live in an ideal world, far from it. In spite of our best efforts to spread goodness and kindness, the world often frowns at us, ridicules us or just turns the cold shoulder of indifference. The rudeness, harshness and ingratitude of the world sometimes overwhelms us and we feel a sense of hopelessness. What use is our giving if nobody appreciates it? Faced with this discouraging lack of receptivity it’s easy to give up loving and serving the world and humanity. An inner hero tries to see the bigger picture. The world is not a finished product, it is in the process of evolution. In order to change the world the...